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BASIC SECURITY

Alarm systems are great, but…LOCK YOUR DOORS!!! (Houses and Cars)

If you get an unexpected knock at the door, check to see who it is before opening it.

All entrances (doors and windows) to your home should be well lit at night.

Motion activated security lights are great at night

High-risk windows (basement, garage, ground-level, partially or totally secluded, latched, etc.) should be secured sufficiently enough to discourage or impede possible intrusion.

Don't leave extra keys under doormats, potted plants or any other obvious outdoor location. Thieves will generally find them. Find an inconspicuous place to hide the keys, or give a set to a neighbor you can trust.

Use solid core or metal doors that are secured with good quality deadbolt locks. Look for or ask the locksmith for door locks with an ANSI grade 1 rating. Deadbolt locks should have a horizontal bolt at least 1 inch long. With shorter bolts, a burglar can more easily use tools to spread the door frame and open the door.

If you lose your keys, change the locks immediately.

Keep garage doors closed at all times. Even when you're home, it's important to safeguard your belongings and your family. By keeping garage doors closed, it prohibits intruders from gaining access to a door that leads directly into your home.

Burglar-proof your glass patio doors by setting a pipe or metal bar in the middle bottom track of the door slide. The pipe should be the same length as the track.

Store cash, jewelry and other valuables in a safe or safety deposit box instead of leaving them lying around the home.

Don't leave notes on the door for service people or family members when you're not there. These alert the burglar that you are not home.

If someone comes to your door asking to use the phone to call a mechanic or the police, keep the door locked and make the call yourself. Remember burglars usually knock 1st to see if your home. So call the police right away, so the person can be identified.

Operation Identification (engrave you drivers license number on valuables). Photograph items and record serial numbers.

If you’re sleeping solo these days, take your car’s remote control to bed with you. If you hear suspicious noises, push the remote’s “panic” button and let the alarm scare away intruders.

WHEN ON VACATION

Create the illusion that someone is at your house if you're away for an extended period of time. Leave a TV or stereo on in a room where a burglar would most likely break in.

Use light timers

Do not post that you are out of town on your social network, i.e., Facebook page.

Keep drapes and blinds shut - especially in rooms where there is expensive equipment. Don't advertise the items in your home.

Virgin snow is a sure sign that no one’s home. If you’re away after a snowstorm, ask a neighbor’s kid to tromp around your yard, creating footprints that will fool a burglar into thinking you’re around but just haven’t gotten around to shoveling your snow yet.

If you can, have your calls forwarded while you're away. Burglars sometimes call to see if anyone's home before a break-in